• Pippa
    Keymaster
    Post count: 9
    #190 |

    Hi All,

    This is Pippa. I’ve been gaming for as long as I can remember. I LOVE anything Super Mario and I’ve been pretending to be a smuggler/jedi since I first saw A New Hope when I was 5. Also, I love to knit and sew…which has nothing to do with gaming, but if you need anything let me know.

    May the force be with you.

  • Que
    Participant
    Post count: 73
    #196 |

    Hey Pippa.
    Welcome to the site…

  • Baron DeBelleme
    Participant
    Post count: 157
    #203 |

    I could use a pair of dark green or blue Kynsikkäät. Fingerless Gloves.

    • Pippa
      Keymaster
      Post count: 9
      #369 |

      What size? Also, if you can give me a better idea on what color, I could arrange that. 🙂

  • Baron DeBelleme
    Participant
    Post count: 157
    #370 |

    I don’t know how sizes go internationally but my work gloves are about 9 or 10, big claw. Too tight is not good as the smallest blood veins’ blood circulation is made harder, which in turn can make the hands feel cold. Feels worse in winter.

    I kinda like this pic:
    Kynsikäs 1

    Another example for fishermen for example, with a moving glovetip:
    Fisherman's tipless glove

    And kynsikkäät for the rarest type animal of the forest, fisherwoman:
    Rare

    How about that 🙂

    • Ev
      Keymaster
      Post count: 41
      #374 |

      What are those last gloves made of? they look different…

      oh, and do fingerless gloves actually keep your hands warm enough? I’ve seen people wear them but all the gloves I’ve had never really kept my hands warm, mittens were always the best bet.

      • Pippa
        Keymaster
        Post count: 9
        #378 |

        So, upon research of those gloves it looks like they are made from Tibetan Masstif. A little unusal, but it is not completely unique. There are alot of cold region dogs and other animals that have coats that make fantastic yarns. Also, had I not looked up the picture I would have guessed Angora or Mohair. So, this is where I geek out. In case you or anyone else didn’t know mohair is made from angora goats and angora is made from…rabbits. XD

  • Baron DeBelleme
    Participant
    Post count: 157
    #379 |

    I just want to clear out the wool is indeed extracted from such a mastiff but in a non-violent way. I don’t know what it is called but dirct translation could be ‘groud wool’, which is extracted using a tool made for it. No dogs were killed for this set ov gloves 🙂

    I red that the heat rating is about the same as in Angora but I think that the warmth depends on the knitting style and the thickness of the layer. The gloves are not ment to keep hands warm in -20, for those weathers we put on the real glove. When we need nible fingers then, throw the winter gloves off and do the work, then put gloves back on. They give some cover for the skin if we have to crawl or be in a difficult spot so that the hand touches or leans on iron which is outside (really cold of course) or snow. Without, skin would very quickly turn cold and perhaps have a minor frost bite (cold iron).

    Gloves of Cold Protection +5%, this is it 🙂

  • Ev
    Keymaster
    Post count: 41
    #380 |

    well, this is really interesting. seriously, no idea dog fur was used for glove creation.

    and are you talking -20C? I’m trying to grasp exactly how cold it is comparatively. I’ve been out in some freaking cold temperatures for the US (-26F, which actually froze our accelerator open and broke another persons heating system… terrifying experience. and snowboarding at -12 and getting stuck on a chairlift for what seemed like an hour), but I know that is probably nothing compared to Finland. Even ski gloves never seemed to work perfect in stuff like that, though that may be from constantly being in the snow.

  • Baron DeBelleme
    Participant
    Post count: 157
    #383 |

    To assist in getting the grasp, use the converter at http://www.albireo.ch/temperatureconverter/

    -15 C to -22 C is something of a regular temperature during winter here. I red my previous post and forgot to make it clear that when I use the fingerless gloves, I put the winter glove on top of fingerless gloves. That way the winter glove is off when I need nible fingers and when driving a snow mobile or while snowboarding, a thicker glove on top of it.

    From the sound of it, you cold temps of – 25 F (-32 C) come up every now and then although this winter was an exception and we had it probably about three times when the temp fell that low or worse. Last winter we had a few -36 F (-38 C according to the converter at least) moments.

    For the chairlifts, most skiing centers here have set working limits to -13 F to -18 F depending in the skiing center (the one where I worked at, we stopped the chairlift at -13 F). The stress to lift equipment like for example the bearings of wirewheels become greater, and another is the lubrication of engines and gearboxes in the cold engine rooms. If any of those fail at that temp, the lift will stop right there and people will be stuck on the chairs, quite high up in the air. And THAT is where the serious part kicks in as customers start to freeze on those windy chairs. We did the drills how to empty a chairlift from people and I tell you it requires alot more staff to do it all in time, that is at work at any moment. It is also physically very demanding and not all had a physique of a climber, not even close. Dangerous too and the equipment we had to reel the people down from the chairs (one person is at the wire and goes downwards from one chair to the next, reeling people down with a ropechair with safety harnesses) would not have been adequate to reel down a person of 20-years-of-McDonalds weight. We reeled down a few fellow workers to get a feel for it, so did the rest of the guys.

    The temperature limit depends on the type of chairlift as well, there are some with cover from wind and some are almost completely sealed. People stay well for a much longer time then if stuck while on the lift.

    Freezing the customers just is not good business. Luckily nothing above ever happened, we just were prepared for the rescue op if it should happen. In this I would’ve used my fingerless gloves + winter gloves (mitten type with no separate finger comparments 🙂 ). A balaclava to cover the face from cold bites, thick winter overall with protection from wind and cold and snowmobiling boots. Safety harness on top of that and the other harness set for the reeling down. Twas a good package 🙂

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